Thursday, April 5, 2012

100 Word Review: A Red Herring Without Mustard

This is the third of the Flavia de Luce series by Alan Bradley, and possibly the best in the series.  Eleven-year-old Flavia de Luce is Nancy Drew, Trixie Belden, and Miss Marple rolled into a precocious, stubborn, highly intelligent, mystery-solving child heroine. I could just go back and repeat my review from The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie, which I adored.  These books are so charming and refreshing!  Flavia, her family, and the eccentric cast of characters from the hamlet of Bishop's Lacey are such a nice change of pace. I look forward to the much desired relationship between Flavia and her father developing further in the future books.  It borders on touching in this one. 
If you are looking for a fun series that takes a break from vampires, werewolves, forbidden teen romances, and government controlled fights to the death, then you might like (adore) these cerebral murder mysteries.  Just make sure you read each character with the appropriate British accent...you won't be able to help it. 
[By the way, I did read The Weed That Strings the Hangman's Bag, the second book in the series, last year while I was enthralled in grad school work.  I never wrote a review of it, but it's just as delightful and fun as Sweetness and Red Herring.]


Here's my 100 word review of A Red Herring Without Mustard by Alan Bradley.


A gypsy with a crystal ball...
a message from the buried past...
an accidental tent fire...
a savage attack...
knife-wielding Porcelain...
buried baby bones...
murder under Poseiden's toe...
a fishy-smelling culprit...
a religious cult...
a red bull.


A perpetually grieving father...
a bankrupt estate...
the chemistry lab...
Gladys, the bicycle...
sibling rivalry...
a family portrait...
lots of red herrings...
and a girl longing to know her dead mother and be admired by her vacant father.


A charming 1950's murder mystery with the suspense, wit, cleverness, and mastery of the English language that Flavia fans have come to expect.


(100)






No comments:

Post a Comment